Videos and webinars

Essential skills are the foundation for learning all other skills. A series of videos and webinars have been developed to:

  • help you learn how improving your essential skills can lead to success in the workplace;
  • provide you with the latest developments in literacy and essential skills research; and
  • share knowledge, support networking and building capacity in “what works”.
Videos

Videos: Applying skills at work

Essential skills for a winning team
Essential skills for a winning team (transcript)

Workplace essential skills are the foundation skills everyone uses while performing the tasks required for their jobs.

There are nine skills that are essential in today's workplace. All nine are used in different combinations, in different applications, in every occupation. They're the foundational skills you rely on to carry out your work tasks and they're the building blocks you use to learn new ones. They're essential to your success.

The nine essential skills are: reading; document use; numeracy; writing; oral communication; working with others; thinking skills; computer use, and... continuous learning. Let's see how keeping the nine essential skills in mind can really affect perspective, decision-making, and the way forward.

Raymond is a foreman for a busy construction company. To help offset his workload on one of the sites he's managing, he delegates some of his duties to Roger, a senior member of his crew.

Raymond asks Roger to coordinate the movement of equipment and staff from one area of the site to another. However, after a few hours Raymond notices a lack of progress and an overall sense of confusion amongst the workers. Many of them were coming to Raymond for guidance, even though he had given the task to Roger. And of course, when trying to coordinate heavy machinery, workers and tight deadlines, safety becomes an issue.

Was Roger not taking the task seriously? Did he not realize the importance of the team's safety and the company's deadline? If you look at this situation through an essential skills lens, you can see that there may be more to the story... After talking with some of the crew, Raymond realized that Roger had trouble giving direction and coordinating the team. Even though Roger was an organized person and was good at his job individually, he found it hard to work with a group of people. Raymond saw value in Roger's years of experience on work sites and saw potential in him as a crew leader. So he brought in an essential skills coach to give Roger the tools necessary to communicate with others... clearly and with confidence.

By looking at the problem through an essential skills lens, Raymond was able to identify the issue and resolve it. And Roger got the skills needed to perform well in a leadership role.

The nine essentials skills are the key to acquiring and applying all other skills. Whether you're planning to implement a new process, reviewing training effectiveness or experiencing issues in the workplace that are hard to define, viewing everything through an essential skills lens is critical to moving forward.

Essential skills: you use them all day long.

Essential skills to get ahead
Essential skills to get ahead (transcript)

Workplace essential skills are the foundation skills everyone uses while performing the tasks required for their jobs.

There are nine skills that are essential in today's workplace. All nine are used in different combinations, in different applications, in every occupation. They're the foundational skills you rely on to carry out your work tasks and they're the building blocks you use to learn new ones. They're essential to your success.

The nine essential skills are: reading; document use; numeracy; writing; oral communication; working with others; thinking skills; computer use, and... continuous learning. Let's see how keeping the nine essential skills in mind can really affect perspective, decision-making, and the way forward.

Pascal is Operations Manager at a large technology firm that recently gave him the task of increasing productivity on the production line. Pascal saw an opportunity to introduce a new workflow initiative, which requires workers to move from station to station when bottlenecks appear in the production line. This meant workers would need to be able to read documents and manuals and interpret tables and charts at each new station.

To launch this big program, Pascal decided that his first step was to look at his objective with an essential skills perspective. He brought in an essential skills instructor who trained the workers in the skills they needed to interpret the documents at their new stations. The instructor also taught them how to work as a team to resolve problems on the production line. By looking at the issue with an essential skills perspective, Pascal was able to facilitate a smooth and successful transition to new processes, and was able to better meet the workplace goals.

The nine essentials skills are the key to acquiring and applying all other skills. Whether you're planning to implement a new process, reviewing training effectiveness or experiencing issues in the workplace that are hard to define, viewing everything through an essential skills lens is critical to moving forward.

Essential skills: you use them all day long.

Essential skills for managing change
Essential skills for managing change (transcript)

Workplace essential skills are the foundation skills everyone uses while performing the tasks required for their jobs.

There are nine skills that are essential in today's workplace. All nine are used in different combinations, in different applications, in every occupation. They're the foundational skills you rely on to carry out your work tasks and they're the building blocks you use to learn new ones. They're essential to your success.

The nine essential skills are: reading; document use; numeracy; writing; oral communication; working with others; thinking skills; computer use, and... continuous learning. Let's see how keeping the nine essential skills in mind can really affect perspective, decision-making, and the way forward.

Frank has worked in the warehouse for many years, and was recently promoted to a supervisor position. Part of his new duties include using an on-line system for reporting and scheduling... something that he was used to doing on paper.

The company's HR Manager, Sabitha, has noticed that Frank's reports are coming in late and often incomplete. He'd been shown the procedure for entering information on-line when he first received his promotion. So what was the issue? Could he not handle the workload? Did he not want the responsibilities associated with his new job? If you look at this situation through an essential skills lens, you can see there may be more to the story... It was assumed that Frank had all the computer skills he needed to complete the task. In fact, he was having trouble with such basics as entering information into a template and then saving his work to a folder. And Frank didn't tell anyone he was struggling, he just continued to hand in work that was late and incomplete.

Once Sabitha realized the issue was about his computer use skills and not a personal or behavioral issue, she arranged a brief but targeted training session for Frank. With the more customized instruction, he gained the computer use skills he needed and adapted quickly to his new role.

The nine essentials skills are the key to acquiring and applying all other skills. Whether you're planning to implement a new process, reviewing training effectiveness or experiencing issues in the workplace that are hard to define, viewing everything through an essential skills lens is critical to moving forward.

Essential skills: you use them all day long.

Webinars

Upcoming webinars

Coming soon

Contact us to be added to our mailing list.

Previous webinars

Webinars

Building essential skills in the skilled trades

On March 5, 2015, we brought together industry leaders who shared their findings and experience on the need for strong essential skills in the skilled trades. Practical and effective strategies were presented to help trainers, advisors, employment counsellors and others to address skills gaps and increase success in technical training, certification and in the workplace.

Building success for immigrants with essential skills

On March 22, 2012, we brought together a wide variety of stakeholders to discuss the importance of essential skills for immigrants in today’s knowledge-based economy. Highlights included presentations by the Ottawa Local Immigration Partnership, Winnipeg School Division, and NorQuest College’s Centre for Excellence in Intercultural Education.

Literacy and essential skills tools: Make them work for you

On February 6, 2012, we showcased the various tools and supports made available through OLES to help address literacy and essential skills challenges in the workplace. Participants gained a better understanding of the tools and their purpose; how to select and use the tools in three easy steps; where and how to access the tools online; and, how the tools can be customized to meet individual/organization's needs.

Making required skills investments go further

On December 14, 2011, we discussed the importance and benefits of workplace LES in today's knowledge-based economy. Highlights included a presentation on the business case for investing in LES, a summary of OLES' partnership with the Canada Business Network and an overview of the Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters' essential skills through Safety and Health project.

Literacy and essential skills: An aboriginal context

On November 3, 2011, we shared good practices and lessons learned, as well as ESDC tools and resources, that may benefit those working in Aboriginal LES, designing and delivering employment programs and services to help Aboriginal people prepare for, find and maintain jobs.

Contact us for more information on our previous webinars.

Date modified: