Employment Equity Act: Annual report 2013

Message from the Minister

"We will encourage our partners to consider the needs of their employees and tailor their approaches accordingly to ensure healthy, inclusive workplaces for all Canadians."

The Honourable Dr K. Kellie Leitch,
Canada's Labour Minister

I am pleased to present the Employment Equity Act: Annual Report 2013, which outlines efforts made by federally regulated private-sector employers to create and foster inclusive workplaces.

In 2012, Canada's workforce continued to evolve. A still-recovering global economy, coupled with skills shortages in many sectors and regions in Canada, serves as a reminder that all Canadians deserve the opportunity to achieve their full potential and contribute to Canada's prosperity.

The Employment Equity Act promotes equitable representation for women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities who work in federally regulated workplaces. In our current environment, employment equity has an increasingly important role to play both in addressing the needs of Canadian business, and in achieving our goal of creating jobs, economic growth and long-term prosperity for all Canadians. While 2012 saw improvements in some areas, it is clear there is still work that needs to be done to ensure these four groups are represented at levels that match their labour market availability.

Moving forward, our government will continue to collaborate with employers, governments and other stakeholders in the pursuit of improved representation and use of available skills and talents among the four designated groups. We will encourage our partners to consider the needs of their employees and tailor their approaches accordingly to ensure healthy, inclusive workplaces for all Canadians.

In the coming year, it is my hope that we continue our joint efforts to build fair, safe and productive workplaces – for the benefit of Canada's society and our economy.

The Honourable Dr K. Kellie Leitch
P.C. O. Ont., M.P.
Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women

Introduction

"The purpose of this Act is to achieve equality in the workplace so that no person shall be denied employment opportunities or benefits for reasons unrelated to ability and, in the fulfilment of that goal, to correct the conditions of disadvantage in employment experienced by women, aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities by giving effect to the principle that employment equity means more than treating persons in the same way but also requires special measures and the accommodation of differences."

- Section 2 of the Employment Equity Act

Under the Employment Equity Act (the Act), the Minister of Labour must submit a report to Parliament describing the status of employment equity in the federally regulated private sectorFootnote 1. Under the Act, employers in the federally regulated private sector with a workforce of 100 employees or more must file a report with the Minister by June 1 every year. The Employment Equity Act: Annual Report 2013 consolidates the information submitted by employers for 2012 and highlights the progress that employers have made in achieving an equitable workforce for the four designated groups: women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities.

The report also compares this year's data with last year's, and with the data from 2001 (the year when the Act was last reviewed) and 1987 (the year reporting began). The representation of designated groups is compared to their labour market availability (LMA). Progress has been made when the gap between a group's representation and its LMA narrows, or when the group's representation exceeds its LMA.

About the data

The LMA data for women, Aboriginal peoples and members of visible minorities is obtained from the Statistics Canada Census. Data for persons with disabilities is obtained from the Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS), which is also conducted by Statistics Canada.

There is a time lag in measuring representation gaps in this report because the 2012 representation is being compared to 2006 Census and PALS availability data. Availability estimates based on the 2011 Census will be released in 2014.

Representation is the share of designated groups in a given labour force (e.g., the entire federally regulated private-sector workforce, the banking sector or an individual bank).

Labour market availability refers to the share of designated group members in the workforce from which the employers could hire.

Section 1 – Year in review

Employers in the federally regulated private sector continue to make progress toward employment equity, but the results vary across designated groups and sectors. Employers still need to make improvements in order to achieve a fully representativeFootnote 2 workforce.

  • The representation rate for three of the four designated groups (women, Aboriginal peoples and persons with disabilities) remained below their LMA. In contrast, representation for members of visible minorities continued to exceed the group's LMA.
  • The representation of women has fluctuated over the years settling at 40.9% in 2012, which is the same as it was in 1987, reflecting attainment of 85.4% of LMA (a shortfall of 14.6%). Since 1987, the increase in the number of women (29.6%) in the federally regulated private-sector workforce has matched the increase in the number of men (29.8%).
  • The representation of Aboriginal peoples climbed from 0.7% in 1987 to 2.0% in 2012. Despite the number of Aboriginal peoples in the federally regulated private sector more than quadrupling since 1987, the representation rate remains at 64.5% of the group's LMA, a gap of 35.5%.
  • The representation of persons with disabilities increased a full percentage point from 1.6% in 1987 to 2.6% in 2012, reaching just over half (53.1%) of the 4.9% LMA. Although the percentage representation has not increased significantly (still lagging by 46.9%), there has been a substantial rise in the number of persons with disabilities working in the federally regulated private sector since the Act came into force. This number more than doubled to over 20,000 in 2012.
  • Members of visible minorities have seen the most progress with their representation, which increased from 5.0% in 1987 to 18.6% in 2012, surpassing the group's LMA of 15.3%. This is the only designated group in the federally regulated private sector whose overall representation surpasses its LMA.

The number of designated group members in the federally regulated private-sector workforce has increased over time; however, percentage gains in terms of representation are harder to achieve. It was found that:

  • overall, women continue to lag behind in earnings, and women who are members of other designated groups fare worse than women overall, especially Aboriginal women.
  • persons with disabilities and Aboriginal peoples have seen minimal increases in actual employee numbers and have stalled in overall percentage representation.
  • visible minorities are represented at levels above their LMA and were not affected in sectors that saw job losses.
  • job losses in the communications sector affected women, persons with disabilities and Aboriginal peoples, while job losses in the 'other' sector affected women and persons with disabilities.

Progress in representation over time in the federally regulated private sector

Representation Progress - description follows image

* Representation Progress-Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census and 2006 PALS.

Text description: Progress in representation over time in the federally regulated private sector
1987 Representation 2001 Representation 2011 Representation 2012 Representation Availability* source of availability for Representation Progress
Women 40.9% 44.9% 41.2% 40.9% 47.9%
Aboriginal Peoples 0.7% 1.6% 2.0% 2.0% 3.1%
Persons with Disabilities 1.6% 2.3% 2.6% 2.6% 4.9%
Members of Visible Minorities 5.0% 11.7% 18.2% 18.6% 15.3%

Sector

The federally regulated private sector is made up of four sectors:

Banking
Includes all major Canadian banks.
Communications
Comprises radio and television broadcasting, telecommunications and postal and courier services.
Transportation
Consists of employers in the air, rail, bus and water transportation industries; inter-provincial trucking; pipelines; and investigation and security services.
'Other'
Encompasses a diverse group of employers working in industries such as nuclear power generation; warehousing and storage; metal ore mining; professional, scientific and technical services; finance; construction management; food, wood, chemical and equipment manufacturing; wholesale trade; waste management; arts, entertainment and recreation; and, public administration.

Federally regulated private sector: Overall workforce

A total of 516 employers filed a report with the Minister of Labour for 2012. Together, these employers had a total of 772,480 employees across Canada, which represents approximately 4.3% of the Canadian workforce. This is a net increase of 3,933 employees over the previous year, even though the number of employers dropped slightlyFootnote 3.

At the sectorial level only the banking and transportation sectors saw a workforce increase (1.4% and 3.5%, respectively). The communications and 'other' sectors saw an overall workforce decrease of 1.9% and 5.1%, respectively.

Transportation remained the largest sector with 67.2% of employers and 32.9% of employees. Despite having the lowest number of employers (25), the banking sector comprised 29.4% of employees in the federally regulated private sector.

The table below shows the sectorial composition of the federally regulated private-sector workforce for the 2012 calendar year.

Table 1: Number of employers and employees (1987, 2011 and 2012) in the federally regulated private sector

Table 1: Representation
Sector Employers Employees
1987
#
2011
#
2012
#
1987
#
2011
#
2012
#
Banking 23 25 25 169,632 224,378 227,455
Communications 90 81 72 179,247 235,275 230,819
Transportation 208 345 347 203,207 245,819 254,330
Other 52 78 72 43,331 63,075 59,876
All sectors 373 529 516 595,417 768,547 772,480

In terms of representation of designated groups, the banking sector has achieved a workforce composition that exceeds LMA for women and members of visible minorities.

The communications sector is fully representative of members of visible minorities, and the 'other' sector has achieved full representation for Aboriginal peoples.

No sector has achieved representation equal to the LMA for persons with disabilities.

Table 2: Designated group representation by sector

Table 2: Representation
Sector 2012 Representation
Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
% % % %
Banking 63.7 1.3 3.8 28.2
Communications 37.7 1.7 2.3 17.1
Transportation 26.0 2.6 1.8 13.4
Other 30.1 3.8 2.5 10.7
All sectors 40.9 2.0 2.6 18.6
Availability* 47.9 3.1 4.9 15.3

Section 2 – Designated groups

Women

The number of women in the federally regulated private sector has increased since 1987. However, women's representation in 2012 continued its downward trend to 40.9%, remaining below the group's LMA of 47.9% and achieving 85.4% of LMA.

Representation and availability of women in the federally regulated private sector

Chart 2 - description follows image

* Graph 2.1-Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

Text description: Representation and availability of women in the federally regulated private sector
Year All employees Women
Total
#
Representation
%
Availability
%
1987 595,417 243,744 40.9 44.0
1988 613,688 257,417 41.9 44.0
1989 631,015 268,340 42.5 44.0
1990 631,423 276,161 43.7 44.0
1991 615,135 271,927 44.2 45.9
1992 602,265 269,089 44.7 45.9
1993 582,363 264,804 45.5 45.9
1994 599,311 265,950 44.4 45.9
1995 588,047 261,437 44.5 45.9
1996 571,883 256,250 44.8 46.4
1997 571,138 254,325 44.5 46.4
1998 589,218 260,204 44.2 46.4
1999 588,759 262,629 44.6 46.4
2000 600,220 262,602 43.8 46.4
2001 634,759 284,720 44.9 47.3
2002 629,916 279,817 44.4 47.3
2003 621,457 273,496 44.0 47.3
2004 651,048 282,747 43.4 47.3
2005 672,652 291,198 43.3 47.3
2006 698,210 300,747 43.1 47.9
2007 733,789 313,385 42.7 47.9
2008 744,011 316,937 42.6 47.9
2009 743,837 314,430 42.3 47.9
2010 755,966 315,109 41.7 47.9
2011 768,547 316,755 41.2 47.9
2012 772,480 315,930 40.9 47.9

Table 3 provides details on the employment situation of women in each sector of the federally regulated private sector.

  • While the representation of women decreased slightly overall from the previous year, the transportation and 'other' sectors reported increases in their representation of women.
  • There was a net increase of 3,933 employees in the federally regulated private-sector workforce from 2011 to 2012. However, the total number of women decreased by 825.
    • The most significant decrease was noted in the communications sector with a 4.3% drop in the number of women as compared to 2011.
    • In contrast, the number of men in the communications sector dropped by 0.4% from 2011 to 2012.
  • All sectors combined, more women left the federally regulated private-sector workforce than entered it.
    • These losses are a result of the large number of women leaving the communications sector, where more women left than were hired. The trend was reversed in the other three sectors, where more women entered the workforce than left it.
  • The transportation and 'other' sectors had shares of hires that exceeded shares of terminationsFootnote 4, which means that more women entered the workforce than left it. This is a contributing factor to the increase in representation observed in these two sectors.

Table 3: Number, representation, hires, promotions, and terminations of women in the federally regulated private sector by sectorsFootnote 5

Table 3: Representation
Women
All sectors Banking Communications Transportation Other
2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012
Number employed 316,755 315,930 144,797 144,898 90,877 86,927 62,552 66,068 18,529 18,037
Representation 41.2% 40.9% 64.5% 63.7% 38.6% 37.7% 25.4% 26.0% 29.4% 30.1%
Number of hires 43,755 40,983 16,118 16,859 12,690 9,372 12,530 12,731 2,417 2,021
Number of promotions 23,806 22,527 15,407 15,203 4,659 4,499 2,576 1,789 1,164 1,036
Number of terminations 42,446 41,832 15,582 16,479 13,466 13,196 10,230 10,310 3,168 1,847
Share of hirings 35.3% 35.4% 54.5% 54.9% 35.7% 33.4% 24.6% 25.7% 30.4% 27.6%
Share of promotions 46.2% 47.2% 59.3% 58.8% 35.9% 36.0% 28.9% 29.8% 32.0% 30.6%
Share of terminations 35.9% 36.9% 60.0% 59.5% 37.0% 38.2% 22.5% 23.5% 31.0% 25.7%

More women in permanent full-time positions earned $60,000 or more in 2012 than in 2011. However, the salaries reported in 2012 showed that the highest percentage of women in permanent full-time positions (43.4%) earned a salary below $50,000. In contrast, 29.3% of men were in this salary range in 2012. The majority of men (51.5%) earned $60,000 or more, whereas only 35.7% of women received earnings in that salary range.

Table 4: Distribution of salary ranges by year and gender

Table 4: Representation
Salary range Distribution of permanent full-time employees
2011 2012
Men
%
Women
%
Men
%
Women
%
$60,000 and above 49.9 33.6 51.5 35.7
$50,000 to $59,999 19.8 20.7 19.2 20.9
Below $50,000 30.3 45.7 29.3 43.4

Aboriginal peoples

The representation of Aboriginal peoples has increased steadily since 1987 but has remained at 2.0% for a second consecutive year, achieving 64.5% of LMA. The LMA for Aboriginal peoples is 3.1%.

Representation and availability of aboriginal peoples in the federally regulated private sector * source of availability for graph 3.1

Chart 3 - description follows image

* Graph 3.1-Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census. In 1996, the Census methodology changed with respect to computation of the availability of Aboriginal peoples, thereby causing a drop.

Text description: Representation and availability of aboriginal peoples in the federally regulated private sector
Year All employees Aboriginal peoples
Total
(#)
Representation
(%)
Availability
(%)
1987 595,417 3,921 0.7 2.1
1988 613,688 4,386 0.7 2.1
1989 631,015 4,993 0.8 2.1
1990 631,423 5,387 0.9 2.1
1991 615,135 5,923 1.0 3.0
1992 602,265 6,092 1.0 3.0
1993 582,363 6,079 1.0 3.0
1994 599,311 6,600 1.1 3.0
1995 588,047 6,895 1.2 3.0
1996 571,883 6,955 1.2 2.1
1997 571,138 7,354 1.3 2.1
1998 589,218 7,764 1.3 2.1
1999 588,759 8,581 1.5 2.1
2000 600,220 8,867 1.5 2.1
2001 634,759 9,865 1.6 2.6
2002 629,916 10,468 1.7 2.6
2003 621,457 10,276 1.7 2.6
2004 651,048 10,956 1.7 2.6
2005 672,652 11,854 1.8 2.6
2006 698,210 12,364 1.8 3.1
2007 733,789 13,920 1.9 3.1
2008 744,011 13,958 1.9 3.1
2009 743,837 14,013 1.9 3.1
2010 755,966 14,686 1.9 3.1
2011 768,547 15,166 2.0 3.1
2012 772,480 15,778 2.0 3.1

Table 5 provides details on the employment situation of Aboriginal peoples in each sector of the federally regulated private sector.

  • The representation of Aboriginal peoples is highest in the 'other' and transportation sectors (3.8% and 2.6%, respectively). Representation in these sectors exceeds the group's overall representation of 2.0%, and in the 'other' sector, it exceeds the group's LMA of 3.1%.
    • In these two sectors, the share of hirings of Aboriginal peoples is higher than their share of terminations. This contributes positively to the group's representation levels. In fact, between 2011 and 2012, the representation of Aboriginal peoples increased 0.1 percentage point in the transportation sector and 0.3 percentage point in the 'other' sector. Representation in the banking and communications sectors remained unchanged.
  • A total of 42.4% of Aboriginal peoples working in the federally regulated private sector are employed in the transportation sector.
  • The second biggest proportion of Aboriginal peoples work in the communications sector (24.8%), followed by the banking sector (18.3%) and the 'other' sector (14.6%).

Table 5: Number, representation, hires, promotions, and terminations of Aboriginal peoples in the federally regulated private sector by sector

Table 5: Representation
Aboriginal peoples
All sectors Banking Communications Transportation Other
2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012
Number employed 15,166 15,778 2,881 2,887 3,981 3,907 6,084 6,686 2,220 2,298
Representation 2.0% 2.0% 1.3% 1.3% 1.7% 1.7% 2.5% 2.6% 3.5% 3.8%
Number of hires 2,852 3,088 359 341 535 489 1,730 1,970 228 288
Number of promotions 866 846 304 344 229 232 214 141 119 129
Number of terminations 2,815 2,839 449 428 749 604 1,369 1,556 248 251
Share of hirings 2.3% 2.7% 1.2% 1.1% 1.5% 1.7% 3.4% 4.0% 2.9% 3.9%
Share of promotions 1.7% 1.8% 1.2% 1.3% 1.8% 1.9% 2.4% 2.3% 3.3% 3.8%
Share of terminations 2.4% 2.5% 1.7% 1.5% 2.1% 1.7% 3.0% 3.5% 2.4% 3.5%

More Aboriginal peoples in permanent full-time positions earned $60,000 or more in 2012 than in 2011. Even with this progress, Aboriginal peoples remain at a disadvantage in terms of their distribution across salary ranges. For instance, the proportion of Aboriginal peoples in the $60,000 and above range is lower than their non-Aboriginal counterparts. Aboriginal women in particular are much less likely (27.2%) to earn such salaries compared to all women (35.7%). Correspondingly, the majority of Aboriginal women (51.9%) earned salaries below $50,000 as compared to 43.4% of women overall.

Table 6: Distribution of salary ranges by year and gender

Table 6: Representation
Salary range Distribution of permanent full-time employees
2011 2012
Men Women Aboriginal men Aboriginal women Men Women Aboriginal men Aboriginal women
% % % % % % % %
$60,000 and above 49.9 33.6 46.4 25.4 51.5 35.7 47.6 27.2
$50,000 to $59,999 19.8 20.7 21.2 20.8 19.2 20.9 20.4 20.9
Below $50,000 30.3 45.7 32.4 53.8 29.3 43.4 32 51.9

Persons with disabilities

At 53.1% of LMA, the representation of persons with disabilities remained at 2.6% in 2012, a rate that has remained unchanged since 2010. This rate continues to fall below the group's LMA of 4.9%. Since 1987, the total number of persons with disabilities in the federally regulated private sector has more than doubled.

Representation and availability of persons with disabilities in the federally regulated private sector

Representation Progress - description follows image

* Graph 4.1-Source: Statistics Canada, 1991 Health and Activity Limitation Survey, 2001 PALS and 2006 PALS. The PALS methodology used the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework to define disability rather than the 1980 International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps, which caused a drop.

Text description: Representation and availability of persons with disabilities in the federally regulated private sector
Year All employees Persons with disabilities
Total
(#)
Representation
(%)
Availability
(%)
1987 595,417 9,440 1.6 5.4
1988 613,688 10,343 1.7 5.4
1989 631,015 14,746 2.3 5.4
1990 631,423 15,119 2.4 5.4
1991 615,135 15,438 2.5 6.5
1992 602,265 15,318 2.5 6.5
1993 582,363 14,937 2.6 6.5
1994 599,311 15,736 2.6 6.5
1995 588,047 16,063 2.7 6.5
1996 571,883 15,207 2.7 6.5
1997 571,138 13,228 2.3 6.5
1998 589,218 13,319 2.3 6.5
1999 588,759 14,068 2.4 6.5
2000 600,220 13,929 2.3 6.5
2001 634,759 14,519 2.3 5.8
2002 629,916 14,793 2.3 5.8
2003 621,457 14,425 2.3 5.8
2004 651,048 16,558 2.5 5.8
2005 672,652 18,163 2.7 5.8
2006 698,210 18,662 2.7 4.9
2007 733,789 19,777 2.7 4.9
2008 744,011 19,786 2.7 4.9
2009 743,837 19,758 2.7 4.9
2010 755,966 19,658 2.6 4.9
2011 768,547 19,649 2.6 4.9
2012 772,480 20,232 2.6 4.9

Table 7 provides insight into the situation of persons with disabilities in each sector of the federally regulated private sector.

  • The representation of persons with disabilities in the banking sector increased from 3.4% in 2011 to 3.8% in 2012. Representation decreased in the other three sectors.
    • The banking sector also provided persons with disabilities more opportunities for advancement with a share of promotions of 2.7%. This represents the highest share of promotions for persons with disabilities of any sector.
  • The largest proportion of persons with disabilities in the federally regulated private sector was found in the banking sector (42.9%).
    • This is followed by the communications, transportation and 'other' sectors with 26.7%, 22.9% and 7.5%, respectively.
  • The number of terminations received by persons with disabilities (overall and in each sector) for 2011 and 2012 exceeded their number of hires. If this trend continues, progress in terms of representation levels will remain slow since persons with disabilities are leaving the workforce at a higher rate than they are entering it.

Table 7: Number, representation, hires, promotions, and terminations of persons with disabilities in the federally regulated private sector by sector

Table 7: Representation
Persons with disabilities
All sectors Banking Communications Transportation Other
2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012
Number employed 19,649 20,232 7,729 8,686 5,689 5,396 4,566 4,639 1,665 1,511
Representation 2.6% 2.6% 3.4% 3.8% 2.4% 2.3% 1.9% 1.8% 2.6% 2.5%
Number of hires 1,621 1,594 521 507 383 315 636 696 81 76
Number of promotions 1,074 1,080 617 695 228 238 151 83 78 64
Number of terminations 2,973 2,662 1,000 870 1,047 818 711 784 215 190
Share of hirings 1.3% 1.4% 1.8% 1.7% 1.1% 1.1% 1.2% 1.4% 1.0% 1.0%
Share of promotions 2.1% 2.3% 2.4% 2.7% 1.8% 1.9% 1.7% 1.4% 2.1% 1.9%
Share of terminations 2.5% 2.3% 3.8% 3.1% 2.9% 2.4% 1.6% 1.8% 2.1% 2.6%

More persons with disabilities in permanent full-time positions earned $60,000 or more in 2012 than in 2011. The proportion of men with disabilities earning a salary of $60,000 or more increased from 47.2% to 48.9% and the proportion of women with disabilities with earnings in that range increased from 29.0% to 32.5%. Men with disabilities fare better than women with disabilities: the highest proportion of men with disabilities (48.9%) is in the top salary range while the highest proportion of women with disabilities (43.3%) is in the lowest salary range. This finding is also true for all men and women.

Table 8: Distribution of salary ranges by year and gender

Table 8: Representation
Salary range Distribution of permanent full-time employees
2011 2012
Men
%
Women
%
Men with disabilities
%
Women with disabilities
%
Men
%
Women
%
Men with disabilities
%
Women with disabilities
%
$60,000 and above 49.9 33.6 47.2 29 51.5 35.7 48.9 32.5
$50,000 to $59,999 19.8 20.7 25 26 19.2 20.9 23.6 24.2
Below $50,000 30.3 45.7 27.9 45 29.3 43.4 27.5 43.3

Members of visible minorities

The representation of members of visible minorities has climbed steadily from 5.0% in 1987 to 18.6% in 2012. Since 2007, this group's representation has consistently been above its LMA of 15.3%.

Representation and availability of members of visible minorities in the federally regulated private sector

Representation Progress - description follows image

* Graph 5.1-Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census.

Text description: Representation and availability of members of visible minorities in the federally regulated private sector
Year All employees Members of visible minorities
Total
(#)
Representation
(%)
Availability
(%)
1987 595,417 29,760 5.0 6.3
1988 613,688 34,785 5.7 6.3
1989 631,015 42,092 6.7 6.3
1990 631,423 44,768 7.1 6.3
1991 615,135 46,542 7.6 9.1
1992 602,265 47,618 7.9 9.1
1993 582,363 46,895 8.1 9.1
1994 599,311 49,324 8.2 9.1
1995 588,047 51,967 8.8 9.1
1996 571,883 52,600 9.2 10.3
1997 571,138 55,236 9.7 10.3
1998 589,218 58,078 9.9 10.3
1999 588,759 61,379 10.4 10.3
2000 600,220 64,072 10.7 10.3
2001 634,759 74,049 11.7 12.6
2002 629,916 76,952 12.2 12.6
2003 621,457 79,119 12.7 12.6
2004 651,048 86,572 13.3 12.6
2005 672,652 94,573 14.1 12.6
2006 698,210 104,114 14.9 15.3
2007 733,789 116,491 15.9 15.3
2008 744,011 123,262 16.6 15.3
2009 743,837 127,302 17.1 15.3
2010 755,966 134,256 17.8 15.3
2011 768,547 139,665 18.2 15.3
2012 772,480 143,968 18.6 15.3

Table 9 provides more detail regarding areas of strength leading to the high representation of members of visible minorities. It also identifies sectors where more progress is needed in order for the group's representation to match its LMA.

  • Both the banking and communications sectors have achieved a workforce representation of members of visible minorities that is above the group's LMA.
    • Although not equal to the group's LMA, the representation of members of visible minorities has increased in both the transportation (13.4%) and 'other' (10.7%) sectors when compared to the previous year's representation of 12.5% and 10.0%, respectively.
  • The recruitment levels of members of visible minorities in the banking, communications and transportation sectors are at least equal to the group's LMA. This should continue to have a positive effect on representation levels.
    • The transportation and 'other' sectors have a positive net effect (number of hires minus number of terminations), meaning that members of visible minorities are entering the workforce in these sectors at a greater rate than they are leaving it.

Table 9: Number, Representation, hires, promotions, and terminations of members of visible minorities in the federally regulated private sector by sector

Table 9: Representation
Members of visible minorities
All sectors Banking Communications Transportation Other
2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012
Number employed 139,665 143,968 63,239 64,141 39,298 39,434 30,829 33,983 6,299 6,410
Representation 18.2% 18.6% 28.2% 28.2% 16.7% 17.1% 12.5% 13.4% 10.0% 10.7%
Number of hires 22,299 21,462 8,047 6,161 6,690 6,226 6,765 8,201 797 874
Number of promotions 12,333 11,383 8,560 8,097 2,359 2,158 1,026 779 388 349
Number of terminations 20,649 20,067 6,670 6,862 6,792 6,914 5,641 5,641 1,546 650
Share of hirings 18.0% 18.6% 27.2% 20.1% 18.8% 22.2% 13.3% 16.6% 10.0% 11.9%
Share of promotions 23.9% 23.8% 33.0% 31.3% 18.2% 17.3% 11.5% 13.0% 10.7% 10.3%
Share of terminations 17.5% 17.7% 25.7% 24.8% 18.7% 20.0% 12.4% 12.8% 15.1% 9.0%

More members of visible minorities in permanent full-time positions earned $60,000 or more in 2012 than in 2011. The proportion of visible minority men who earned a salary of $60,000 or more increased from 43.5% to 45.3%, which is 6.2 percentage points lower than the proportion of all men in the same salary range but 11.2 percentage points higher than the proportion of visible minority women in that salary range. The highest proportion of visible minority women (47.3%) earned a salary of $50,000 or less.

Table 10: Distribution of salary ranges by year and gender

Table 10: Representation
Salary range Distribution of permanent full-time employees
2011 2012
Men
%
Women
%
Visible minority men
%
Visible minority women
%
Men
%
Women
%
Visible minority men
%
Visible minority women
%
$60,000 and above 49.9 33.6 43.5 31.8 51.5 35.7 45.3 34.1
$50,000 to $59,999 19.8 20.7 18.4 18.5 19.2 20.9 18.0 18.7
Below $50,000 30.3 45.7 38.1 49.7 29.3 43.4 36.7 47.3

Appendix A

Tables – Federally regulated private-sector employers

The following tables consolidate data from the annual reports submitted by federally regulated private-sector employers. The data provided is from various calendar years: 1987 (the year data was first collected), 2001 (the year the Act was last reviewed), 2011 and 2012.

Tables 1 to 3 in this appendix present data aggregated to include permanent full-time, permanent part-time and temporary employees. Table 4 summarizes information for the four industrial sectors: representation, hires, promotions, terminations and the net effect of hires less terminations. Tables 5 and 6 present salary data for permanent full-time and permanent part-time employees respectively.

Table 1: Representation (1987, 2001, 2011 and 2012) and availability (2006) of federally regulated private-sector employees by designated group, census metropolitan area, province and territory

Appendix A - Employment Equity Act: Annual report 2013

Census metropolitan area and province/territory Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
Representation Availability* Footnote 6 Representation Availability* Footnote 6 Representation Availability* Footnote 6 Representation Availability* Footnote 6
1987 2001 2011 2012 2006 1987 2001 2011 2012 2006 1987 2001 2011 2012 2006 1987 2001 2011 2012 2006
(%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%)
Halifax 41.2 46.2 44.4 43.1 49.6 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.8 1.4 1.6 3.4 4.4 4.3 N/A 1.9 4.1 6.1 6.4 6.3
Montréal 39.0 45.6 41.5 40.6 48.2 0.3 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.5 1.1 1.3 1.6 1.7 N/A 3.0 5.5 13.5 14.4 14.7
Toronto 47.1 46.9 44.2 44.1 48.4 0.6 0.9 1.0 0.9 0.5 1.5 1.9 2.5 2.7 N/A 12.0 23.7 34.1 34.2 40.5
Winnipeg 32.7 38.2 34.4 33.7 48.8 0.8 4.1 6.0 6.3 8.1 1.8 3.4 3.1 3.2 N/A 2.9 6.6 12.1 13.3 14.6
Regina 42.9 52.4 45.5 44.7 49.6 0.4 2.0 2.7 3.3 6.6 2.4 4.4 3.2 3.4 N/A 1.6 4.0 8.7 8.9 6.0
Calgary 47.6 46.8 44.2 43.8 47.3 0.5 1.8 1.8 1.9 2.3 1.9 3.2 2.6 2.4 N/A 5.6 9.9 17.6 18.6 20.3
Edmonton 44.5 41.7 40.6 39.9 47.5 0.7 2.3 2.4 2.5 4.3 2.0 2.9 2.4 2.4 N/A 4.4 9.2 16.4 17.2 15.9
Vancouver 40.4 43.4 38.9 38.3 48.4 0.5 1.5 1.9 2.0 1.8 1.5 2.6 2.8 2.7 N/A 7.9 22.4 32.3 32.4 38.4
Newfoundland and Labrador 38.4 47.8 45.5 45.5 48.1 0.6 3.1 4.4 4.6 4.6 1.0 2.3 1.8 1.8 3.9 0.7 0.7 1.6 1.6 1.1
Prince Edward Island 38.0 48.9 31.9 34.7 49.4 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.5 1.0 1.2 2.2 1.7 2.0 5.7 1.0 0.8 0.9 1.1 1.1
Nova Scotia 34.4 48.8 46.3 45.6 48.6 0.4 0.8 1.7 1.8 2.4 3.5 3.5 4.1 4.1 7.0 1.3 3.3 4.7 5.1 3.7
New Brunswick 32.2 51.8 49.9 49.6 48.0 0.4 0.9 1.3 1.2 2.2 1.8 2.5 3.3 3.3 5.8 1.1 1.6 2.3 2.2 1.6
Quebec 39.8 44.9 40.1 39.2 47.5 0.4 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.3 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.5 3.3 2.6 4.7 10.6 11.3 7.9
Ontario 44.2 46.2 43.2 43.1 48.2 0.7 1.1 1.4 1.4 1.8 1.6 2.2 2.8 3.0 5.2 7.3 16.3 24.2 24.5 21.6
Manitoba 30.5 37.5 33.9 33.4 48.0 1.0 4.5 6.9 7.1 11.4 1.7 3.4 3.1 3.1 5.5 2.6 5.6 10.3 11.2 9.7
Saskatchewan 35.1 42.3 37.3 37.1 47.8 1.4 5.3 7.2 7.8 9.9 1.8 3.3 2.9 2.8 5.5 1.2 3.2 5.4 5.9 3.5
Alberta 45.3 44.9 41.7 41.3 46.9 0.7 2.1 2.3 2.4 4.7 1.9 3.1 2.5 2.5 5.0 4.0 8.4 14.9 15.7 13.1
British Columbia 41.5 44.3 39.5 39.0 48.2 0.7 1.7 2.4 2.5 4.1 1.7 2.7 2.9 2.8 6.2 6.2 17.5 24.7 25.0 23.2
Yukon 31.4 57.6 47.3 44.5 49.1 3.8 5.7 8.9 9.5 20.8 0.8 2.6 3.8 4.0 5.5 1.4 4.3 9.7 10.3 3.8
Northwest Territories 21.9 31.8 25.0 24.5 47.1 9.6 16.1 12.5 9.4 41.0 1.4 1.0 1.9 1.6 4.0 2.5 3.0 7.8 8.0 5.6
Nunavut N/A 25.4 26.5 25.5 47.0 N/A 16.8 33.3 34.7 74.6 N/A 3.8 1.9 1.3 2.7 N/A 3.2 5.9 4.2 2.1
Canada 40.9 44.9 41.2 40.9 47.9 0.7 1.6 2.0 2.0 3.1 1.6 2.3 2.6 2.6 4.9 5.0 11.7 18.2 18.6 15.3

Table 2: Representation (2001, 2011 and 2012) and availability (2006) of federally regulated private-sector employees by designated group and occupational group

Appendix A - Employment Equity Act: Annual report 2013

Occupational group Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
Representation Availability* Footnote 7 Representation Availability* Footnote 7 Representation Availability* Footnote 7 Representation Availability*Footnote 7
2001 2011 2012 2006 2001 2011 2012 2006 2001 2011 2012 2006 2001 2011 2012 2006
(%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%)
Senior managers 19.6 23.5 23.5 24.2 0.5 0.8 0.7 2.4 1.9 2.4 2.5 3.2 3.8 6.7 6.9 8.7
Middle and other managers 42.4 42.4 43.6 39.1 0.8 1.2 1.2 1.9 1.9 2.6 2.8 3.2 8.8 16.1 17.4 14.0
Professionals 44.5 45.0 44.4 54.2 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.8 1.9 2.2 2.5 4.5 16.5 25.8 26.2 16.5
Semi-professionals and technicians 16.9 18.5 18.6 54.3 1.4 2.0 2.1 3.2 1.7 1.9 1.8 4.8 5.1 10.3 10.9 14.3
Supervisors 63.3 60.0 59.7 57.2 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.8 2.0 2.8 3.0 9.5 13.0 18.0 19.0 15.4
Supervisors: Crafts and trades 4.4 7.5 8.1 18.2 2.4 3.0 2.9 2.2 3.1 2.5 2.2 4.6 4.7 8.4 8.8 5.6
Administrative and senior clerical personnel 81.0 74.1 73.6 83.2 1.2 1.6 1.7 2.3 1.9 2.9 3.0 2.6 17.5 24.9 24.4 11.2
Skilled sales and service personnel 45.8 31.8 29.1 45.1 1.3 2.0 2.0 3.1 1.9 1.7 1.6 5.6 6.8 10.4 10.3 17.2
Skilled crafts and trades workers 3.0 3.6 3.6 5.4 2.1 3.3 3.4 3.8 3.0 2.3 2.2 5.3 6.9 10.0 10.6 9.3
Clerical personnel 66.6 66.1 65.8 71.7 1.5 1.9 1.8 2.8 2.6 3.7 3.7 4.4 13.8 21.5 21.5 17.2
Intermediate sales and service personnel 65.9 65.6 67.1 67.9 1.7 2.7 2.9 3.2 1.8 1.5 1.5 5.3 11.0 17.0 18.5 16.5
Semi-skilled manual workers 11.4 12.7 13.3 20.8 2.5 2.9 3.0 3.7 2.4 2.2 2.3 5.5 8.5 13.7 14.3 17.9
Other sales and service personnel 24.2 23.9 23.8 56.5 2.7 1.3 1.9 4.7 2.3 0.9 1.0 6.5 13.4 19.7 20.7 18.5
Other manual workers 8.9 10.9 10.5 24.8 5.4 4.4 5.4 5.7 3.8 2.9 2.8 5.2 6.2 12.4 13.0 15.6
Total number of employees 44.9 41.2 40.9 47.9 1.6 2.0 2.0 3.1 2.3 2.6 2.6 4.9 11.7 18.2 18.6 15.3

Table 3: Distribution of federally regulated private-sector employees by designated group and occupational group (2001, 2011 and 2012)

Appendix A - Employment Equity Act: Annual report 2013

Table 3A
Occupational group Women Men Aboriginal peoples Non-Aboriginal peoples
2001 2011 2012 2001 2011 2012 2001 2011 2012 2001 2011 2012
(%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%)
Senior managers 0.3 0.4 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.8 0.8 0.8
Middle and other managers 9.7 10.3 11.2 10.8 9.8 10.0 5.4 6.0 6.4 10.4 10.1 10.6
Professionals 12.4 16.8 16.7 12.6 14.4 14.5 7.1 7.8 7.8 12.6 15.6 15.5
Semi-professionals and technicians 2.1 2.9 3.0 8.6 9.0 8.9 4.9 6.6 6.5 5.7 6.5 6.5
Supervisors 4.8 4.1 4.2 2.3 1.9 2.0 3.2 2.8 2.8 3.4 2.8 2.9
Supervisors: Crafts and trades 0.1 0.3 0.3 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.1 2.3 2.1 1.4 1.5 1.5
Administrative and senior clerical personnel 12.5 7.7 7.3 2.4 1.9 1.8 5.5 3.5 3.4 7.0 4.3 4.0
Skilled sales and service personnel 1.1 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1
Skilled crafts and trades workers 0.6 0.7 0.7 16.1 13.8 13.4 12.1 14.2 13.8 9.1 8.3 8.1
Clerical personnel 45.3 41.3 40.3 18.5 14.8 14.5 30.0 24.4 22.6 30.5 25.8 25.1
Intermediate sales and service personnel 6.9 7.4 7.5 2.9 2.7 2.5 5.1 6.4 6.5 4.7 4.6 4.5
Semi-skilled manual workers 2.7 4.0 4.3 17.4 19.2 19.2 17.2 19.1 19.2 10.7 12.8 13.0
Other sales and service personnel 1.0 2.9 3.2 2.5 6.5 7.0 3.1 3.4 5.0 1.8 5.1 5.4
Other manual workers 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.4 1.4 1.4 3.0 2.1 2.4 0.8 0.9 0.9
Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Table 3B
Occupational group Persons with disabilities Persons without disabilities Members of visible minorities Non-Visible minority members
2001 2011 2012 2001 2011 2012 2001 2011 2012 2001 2011 2012
(%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%)
Senior managers 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.8 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.8 0.9 0.9
Middle and other managers 8.4 10.0 11.1 10.3 10.0 10.5 7.7 8.9 9.8 10.6 10.2 10.7
Professionals 10.4 13.2 14.4 12.6 15.5 15.4 17.7 21.8 21.7 11.8 14.0 13.9
Semi-professionals and technicians 4.2 4.7 4.6 5.7 6.5 6.5 2.5 3.7 3.8 6.1 7.1 7.1
Supervisors 3.0 3.1 3.3 3.4 2.8 2.9 3.8 2.8 2.9 3.4 2.8 2.9
Supervisors: Crafts and trades 1.9 1.5 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.5 0.6 0.7 0.7 1.5 1.7 1.7
Administrative and senior clerical personnel 5.8 4.9 4.6 7.0 4.3 4.0 10.4 5.9 5.3 6.5 4.0 3.7
Skilled sales and service personnel 0.9 0.7 0.7 1.1 1.1 1.2 0.6 0.6 0.6 1.2 1.2 1.3
Skilled crafts and trades workers 12.2 7.6 6.9 9.1 8.4 8.3 5.4 4.6 4.7 9.7 9.2 9.1
Clerical personnel 34.2 36.9 35.6 30.4 25.5 24.8 36.1 30.5 28.9 29.8 24.7 24.2
Intermediate sales and service personnel 3.7 2.7 2.6 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.5 4.3 4.5 4.8 4.7 4.6
Semi-skilled manual workers 11.4 11.2 11.3 10.8 13.0 13.1 7.9 9.8 10.1 11.2 13.6 13.8
Other sales and service personnel 1.8 1.7 2.0 1.8 5.1 5.5 2.1 5.5 6.0 1.8 5.0 5.3
Other manual workers 1.4 1.0 1.0 0.8 0.9 0.9 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.9 1.0 1.0
Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Table 4: Number, representation, hires, promotions, terminations and net effect of employees in the federally regulated private sector by designated group and sector (1987, 2001, 2011 and 2012)Footnote 8

Appendix A - Employment Equity Act: Annual report 2013

All employees Women Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
1987 2001 2011 2012 1987 2001 2011 2012 1987 2001 2011 2012 1987 2001 2011 2012 1987 2001 2011 2012
Banking (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#)
Employees 169,632 195,870 224,378 227,455 129,076 139,080 144,797 144,898 951 2,139 2,881 2,887 3,053 3,911 7,729 8,686 16,062 33,575 63,239 64,141
Hirings 21,879 25,491 29,552 30,709 16,704 15,210 16,118 16,859 109 232 359 341 158 216 521 507 2,211 3,765 8,047 6,161
Promotions 39,456 27,363 25,975 25,866 27,599 18,716 15,407 15,203 204 319 304 344 607 524 617 695 3,778 5,184 8,560 8,097
Terminations 21,715 23,350 25,987 27,716 16,819 14,951 15,582 16,479 150 294 449 428 331 454 1,000 870 1,432 3,337 6,670 6,862
Net effect**Footnote 9 164 2,141 3,565 2,993 -115 259 536 380 -41 -62 -90 -87 -173 -238 -479 -363 779 428 1,377 -701
(%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%)
Representation 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 76.1 71.0 64.5 63.7 0.6 1.1 1.3 1.3 1.8 2.0 3.4 3.8 9.5 17.1 28.2 28.2
Share of hirings 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 76.3 59.7 54.5 54.9 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.1 0.7 0.8 1.8 1.7 10.1 14.8 27.2 20.1
Share of promotions 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 69.9 68.4 59.3 58.8 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.9 2.4 2.7 9.6 18.9 33.0 31.3
Share of terminations 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 77.5 64.0 60.0 59.5 0.7 1.3 1.7 1.5 1.5 1.9 3.8 3.1 6.6 14.3 25.7 24.8
Communications (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#)
Employees 179,247 215,330 235,275 230,819 71,038 88,861 90,877 86,927 1,090 2,921 3,981 3,907 2,512 5,009 5,689 5,396 7,257 23,359 39,298 39,434
Hirings 17,416 32,521 35,558 28,049 7,515 12,632 12,690 9,372 49 485 535 489 129 286 383 315 975 5,098 6,690 6,226
Promotions 11,099 11,183 12,960 12,505 4,900 5,145 4,659 4,499 55 172 229 232 112 198 228 238 445 1,349 2,359 2,158
Terminations 16,020 27,257 36,379 34,517 6,176 10,871 13,466 13,196 36 385 749 604 112 472 1,047 818 437 3,422 6,792 6,914
Net effect**Footnote 9 1,396 5,264 -821 -6,468 1,339 1,761 -776 -3,824 13 100 -214 -115 17 -186 -664 -503 538 1,676 -102 -688
(%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%)
Representation 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 39.6 41.3 38.6 37.7 0.6 1.4 1.7 1.7 1.4 2.3 2.4 2.3 4.0 10.8 16.7 17.1
Share of hirings 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 43.1 38.8 35.7 33.4 0.3 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.7 0.9 1.1 1.1 5.6 15.7 18.8 22.2
Share of promotions 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 44.1 46.0 35.9 36.0 0.5 1.5 1.8 1.9 1.0 1.8 1.8 1.9 4.0 12.1 18.2 17.3
Share of terminations 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 38.6 39.9 37.0 38.2 0.2 1.4 2.1 1.7 0.7 1.7 2.9 2.4 2.7 12.6 18.7 20.0
Transportation (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#)
Employees 203,207 178,307 245,819 254,330 34,423 43,891 62,552 66,068 1,479 3,588 6,084 6,686 2,892 4,383 4,566 4,639 5,318 13,656 30,829 33,983
Hirings 33,535 41,221 50,995 49,536 7,316 12,564 12,530 12,731 211 891 1,730 1,970 118 699 636 696 691 4,141 6,765 8,201
Promotions 14,723 8,154 8,928 6,007 2,655 1,843 2,576 1,789 123 189 214 141 198 180 151 83 376 510 1,026 779
Terminations 32,588 29,929 45,565 43,913 6,028 7,281 10,230 10,310 168 646 1,369 1,556 231 493 711 784 478 2,345 5,641 5,641
Net effect**Footnote 9
947 11,292 5,430 5,623 1,288 5,283 2,300 2,421 43 245 361 414 -113 206 -75 -88 213 1,796 1,124 2,560
(%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%)
Representation 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 16.9 24.6 25.4 26.0 0.7 2.0 2.5 2.6 1.4 2.5 1.9 1.8 2.6 7.7 12.5 13.4
Share of hirings 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 21.8 30.5 24.6 25.7 0.6 2.2 3.4 4.0 0.4 1.7 1.2 1.4 2.1 10.0 13.3 16.6
Share of promotions 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 18.0 22.6 28.9 29.8 0.8 2.3 2.4 2.3 1.3 2.2 1.7 1.4 2.6 6.3 11.5 13.0
Share of terminations 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 18.5 24.3 22.5 23.5 0.5 2.2 3.0 3.5 0.7 1.6 1.6 1.8 1.5 7.8 12.4 12.8
Other (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#)
Employees 43,331 45,231 63,075 59,876 9,207 12,883 18,529 18,037 401 1,220 2,220 2,298 983 1,218 1,665 1,511 1,123 3,578 6,299 6,410
Hirings 4,500 6,020 7,945 7,333 1,485 1,848 2,417 2,021 46 176 228 288 37 65 81 76 150 489 797 874
Promotions 3,248 3,938 3,633 3,383 856 1,169 1,164 1,036 23 111 119 129 64 76 78 64 85 364 388 349
Terminations 5,080 9,965 10,206 7,187 1,402 2,361 3,168 1,847 40 208 248 251 93 308 215 190 86 576 1,546 650
Net effect** -580 -3,945 -2,261 146 83 -513 -751 174 6 -32 -20 37 -56 -243 -134 -114 64 -87 -749 224
(%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%)
Representation 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 21.2 28.5 29.4 30.1 0.9 2.7 3.5 3.8 2.3 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.6 7.9 10.0 10.7
Share of hirings 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 33.0 30.7 30.4 27.6 1.0 2.9 2.9 3.9 0.8 1.1 1.0 1.0 3.3 8.1 10.0 11.9
Share of promotions 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 26.4 29.7 32.0 30.6 0.7 2.8 3.3 3.8 2.0 1.9 2.1 1.9 2.6 9.2 10.7 10.3
Share of terminations 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 27.6 23.7 31.0 25.7 0.8 2.1 2.4 3.5 1.8 3.1 2.1 2.6 1.7 5.8 15.1 9.0
All sectors (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#) (#)
Employees 595,417 634,738 768,547 772,480 243,744 284,715 316,755 315,930 3,921 9,868 15,166 15,778 9,440 14,521 19,649 20,232 29,760 74,168 139,665 143,968
Hirings 77,330 105,253 124,050 115,627 33,020 42,254 43,755 40,983 415 1,784 2,852 3,088 442 1,266 1,621 1,594 4,027 13,493 22,299 21,462
Promotions 68,526 50,638 51,496 47,761 36,010 26,873 23,806 22,527 405 791 866 846 981 978 1,074 1,080 4,684 7,407 12,333 11,383
Terminations 75,403 90,501 118,137 113,333 30,425 35,464 42,446 41,832 394 1,533 2,815 2,839 767 1,727 2,973 2,662 2,433 9,680 20,649 20,067
Net effect** 1,927 14,752 5,913 2,294 2,595 6,790 1,309 -849 21 251 37 249 -325 -461 -1,352 -1,068 1,594 3,813 1,650 1,395
(%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%) (%)
Representation 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 40.9 44.9 41.2 40.9 0.7 1.6 2.0 2.0 1.6 2.3 2.6 2.6 5.0 11.7 18.2 18.6
Share of hirings 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 42.7 40.1 35.3 35.4 0.5 1.7 2.3 2.7 0.6 1.2 1.3 1.4 5.2 12.8 18.0 18.6
Share of promotions 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 52.5 53.1 46.2 47.2 0.6 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.4 1.9 2.1 2.3 6.8 14.6 23.9 23.8
Share of terminations 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 40.4 39.2 35.9 36.9 0.5 1.7 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.9 2.5 2.3 3.2 10.7 17.5 17.7

Table 5: Federally regulated private-sector employees in permanent full-time employment by designated group, gender and salary range as of December 31, 2012

Appendix A - Employment Equity Act: Annual report 2013

Salary range All employees Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
Total Men Women (%) Total (%) Men Women Total (%) Men Women Total (%) Men Women
Under $15,000 4,916 3,457 1,459 29.7 174 3.5 126 48 58 1.2 44 14 969 19.7 797 172
$15,000 - $19,999 3,359 2,338 1,021 30.4 78 2.3 49 29 37 1.1 24 13 879 26.2 661 218
$20,000 - $24,999 8,887 6,007 2,880 32.4 222 2.5 156 66 131 1.5 91 40 2,254 25.4 1,620 634
$25,000 - $29,999 22,573 12,905 9,668 42.8 486 2.2 246 240 429 1.9 199 230 4,487 19.9 2,754 1,733
$30,000 - $34,999 36,508 16,995 19,513 53.4 975 2.7 474 501 1,056 2.9 439 617 8,477 23.2 3,996 4,481
$35,000 - $37,499 22,362 10,574 11,788 52.7 487 2.2 241 246 689 3.1 272 417 5,126 22.9 2,381 2,745
$37,500 - $39,999 25,354 12,238 13,116 51.7 562 2.2 246 316 734 2.9 308 426 5,654 22.3 2,666 2,988
$40,000 - $44,999 50,693 25,733 24,960 49.2 1,086 2.1 561 525 1,411 2.8 621 790 11,023 21.7 5,312 5,711
$45,000 - $49,999 47,515 25,818 21,697 45.7 980 2.1 535 445 1,327 2.8 684 643 9,840 20.7 4,856 4,984
$50,000 - $59,999 127,119 76,112 51,007 40.1 2,653 2.1 1,678 975 4,088 3.2 2,304 1,784 21,614 17.0 12,267 9,347
$60,000 - $69,999 75,165 48,886 26,279 35.0 1,484 2.0 1,075 409 1,943 2.6 1,202 741 12,277 16.3 7,151 5,126
$70,000 - $84,999 78,392 53,847 24,545 31.3 1,426 1.8 1,021 405 1,986 2.5 1,291 695 13,803 17.6 8,780 5,023
$85,000 - $99,999 48,380 35,532 14,848 30.7 842 1.7 635 207 1,172 2.4 768 404 9,025 18.7 5,894 3,131
$100,000 and over 89,191 67,469 21,722 24.4 1,427 1.6 1,181 246 2,059 2.3 1,502 557 12,799 14.4 9,013 3,786
Total 640,414 395,911 244,503 38.2 12,882 2.0 8,224 4,658 17,120 2.7 9,749 7,371 118,227 18.5 68,148 50,079

Table 6: Federally regulated private-sector employees in permanent part-time employment by designated group, gender and salary range as of December 31, 2012

Appendix A - Employment Equity Act: Annual Report 2013

Salary range All employees Aboriginal peoples Persons with disabilities Members of visible minorities
Total Men Women (%) Total (%) Men Women Total (%) Men Women Total (%) Men Women
Under $5,000 3,922 1,642 2,280 58.1 69 1.8 15 54 99 2.5 43 56 350 8.9 167 183
$5,000 - $7,499 2,706 1,093 1,613 59.6 61 2.3 24 37 52 1.9 24 28 297 11.0 127 170
$7,500 - $9,999 3,656 1,574 2,082 56.9 67 1.8 29 38 76 2.1 38 38 388 10.6 180 208
$10,000 - $12,499 12,016 6,869 5,147 42.8 248 2.1 135 113 215 1.8 127 88 2,406 20.0 1,706 700
$12,500 - $14,999 8,819 4,159 4,660 52.8 237 2.7 108 129 183 2.1 78 105 1,985 22.5 1,145 840
$15,000 - $17,499 8,633 3,696 4,937 57.2 251 2.9 102 149 200 2.3 73 127 1,809 21.0 983 826
$17,500 - $19,999 9,523 4,113 5,410 56.8 212 2.2 88 124 261 2.7 85 176 2,203 23.1 1,181 1,022
$20,000 - $22,499 11,318 4,995 6,323 55.9 252 2.2 102 150 292 2.6 89 203 2,747 24.3 1,548 1,199
$22,500 - $24,999 9,223 3,567 5,656 61.3 204 2.2 72 132 253 2.7 66 187 2,106 22.8 1,011 1,095
$25,000 - $29,999 18,612 7,367 11,245 60.4 417 2.2 148 269 504 2.7 152 352 3,673 19.7 1,734 1,939
$30,000 - $34,999 14,635 6,888 7,747 52.7 350 2.4 180 170 366 2.5 125 241 2,875 19.6 1,585 1,290
$35,000 - $39,999 9,557 4,106 5,451 57.0 194 2.0 81 113 249 2.6 83 166 1,747 18.3 955 792
$40,000 - $49,999 7,125 3,338 3,787 53.2 130 1.8 49 81 174 2.4 59 115 1,070 15.0 597 473
$50,000 and over 4,016 1,648 2,368 59.0 53 1.3 24 29 80 2.0 28 52 431 10.7 216 215
Total 123,761 55,055 68,706 55.5 2,745 2.2 1,157 1,580 3,004 2.4 1,070 1,934 24,087 19.5 13,135 10,952

Appendix B: Technical notes

Employers covered under the Act

The Act covers:

  • federally regulated private-sector employers, Crown corporations and other federal organizations with 100 or more employees;
  • core public administration organizations listed under Schedule I or IV of the Financial Administration Act (FAA) (federal government departments and agencies);
  • separate employer organizations in the federal public sector with 100 or more employees listed in Schedule Vof the FAA (separate agencies);
  • other public sector employer organizations with 100 or more employees, including the Canadian Forces (officers and non-commissioned members in the Regular and Reserve Forces) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (regular and civilian members, excluding federal public service employees); and
  • federal contractor organizations that are provincially regulated suppliers of goods and services with at least 100 employees in Canada that receive contracts above a specified contract value threshold from the federal government.

Additional information available

Every year, federally regulated private-sector employers file a report containing both quantitative and qualitative information that describes the status of employment equity within their organization. This report presents a consolidation of the quantitative information submitted.

  • The data report filed by each employer can be found on the Labour Program website.
  • The qualitative information—in the form of a narrative report describing the measures taken to implement employment equity, the consultation with employee representatives and the results achieved—is available from the Labour Program upon request.

Once the reports are received, every employer is given a performance rating for each of the designated groups. A list of employers and their respective ratings is available on the Labour Program website.

Limitations of the employment equity data

While this report provides the most recent information on employment equity data, it has the following limitations:

  • To measure the progress of the designated groups covered by the Act, their percentage representation (i.e. the number of designated group employees divided by the number of all employees) in the federally regulated private sector is compared to their availability in the workforce population. Availability data is obtained from censuses or surveys conducted every five years by Statistics Canada. As a result, there is a time lag in measuring representation gaps. The current LMA is based on the 2006 Census and 2006 PALS. More information on availability can be found in the Employment Equity Data Report.
  • In some cases, data reported by employers is received after publication deadlines. As a result, differences may exist in the data reported in annual reports for particular years.
  • The data is received from employers on an annual basis. However, the number of employers can shift from one year to the next. Given that the pool of employers changes, comparisons of statistics from year to year may produce inaccurate results.
  • The Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) is responsible for reporting on employment equity in the federal departments, agencies and commissions that make up the core public administration. This information is available on the TBS website. Other areas of the federal public sector are responsible for preparing their own employment equity reports, which can be found on their respective websites or can be obtained upon request. Federal contractors are not required to report annually.
  • Data regarding the investigation and security services subsector was reclassified in 2011 to the transportation sector. Prior to 2011, it was classified under the 'other' sector.

For detailed descriptions of the terms and statistical approaches used in this report, please refer to the Employment Equity Technical Guide.

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